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The ‘Felt Impacts of the Tar Sands’ artwork unveiled at the Canada Europe Energy Summit

Canadian security walks through oil spill - photo by Bradley L Garrett

Giant artwork depicting the Canadian tar sands and the devastation being caused to ecosystems, species and First Nations communities launched by street felt-artist Lucy Sparrow outside Canada House in Trafalgar Square

Street felt-artist Lucy Sparrow today unrolled an ambitious artwork at the annual Canada Europe Energy Summit outside Canada House in Trafalgar Square, as Canadian minister Joe Oliver met with the UK government, the CEO of BP, Bob Dudley, and other major players in the tar sands industry to discuss undermining EU climate legislation, the Fuel Quality Directive, to open up global markets to Canada's highly-polluting fossil fuels.

The Felt Impacts of the Tar Sands - #feltimpacts #tarsands #craftivism from You and I Films on Vimeo.

Liberate Tate stages performance at Tate Britain reopening focusing on BP sponsorship

Art collective Liberate Tate perform rising carbon levels to chronology of Tate Britain re-hang

Southbank Centre artists call for Shell to be dropped as sponsor on Ken Saro-Wiwa anniversary

A group of artists, musicians and authors who have all performed at the Southbank Centre have signed a letter (see below) calling on the arts institution to drop Shell sponsorship on the 18th anniversary of the execution of Ken Saro-Wiwa and the Ogoni 9.

Shell Out Sounds perform 'Oil in the Water' at Royal Festival Hall

Shell Out Sounds sing in the Royal Festival Hall, by Hugh Warwick

Click here to view the video of Shell Out Sounds' November 2013 pop-up performance inside the Royal Festival Hall!

 

Book review: Take the money and run?

Oil, image and sponsorship of the arts

Can Liberate Tate free the arts from BP?

Tate Collection Artist Donates to Liberate Tate

Oil in the Water: audience applauds pop-up choir’s anti-Shell song

Shell Out Sounds in the Royal Festival Hall, by Hugh WarwickOn 25th October, just as a Shell-sponsored performance by the Sao Paolo Symphony Orchestra was about to start, a 15-strong choir suddenly stood up in their seats behind the stage, in full view of the audience, and began to sing.

On 25th October, just as a Shell-sponsored performance by the Sao Paolo Symphony Orchestra was about to start, a 15-strong choir suddenly stood up in their seats behind the stage, in full view of the audience, and began to sing...

Shell targeted by musical protest at South Bank concert

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